Legio Wargames

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By smacdowall, Sep 17 2018 09:24PM

With a view to re-fighting Malplaquet next Spring, Dave Allen and I visited the actual battlefield a few weeks back — as close to the actual day of the battle (11 September) as we could manage. We wanted to understand what the ground was like, how the troops deployed and what they could see, in order to represent it accurately for the wargame.


The battlefield monument
The battlefield monument

Straddling the French-Belgian border just south of Mons the battlefield is easily accessible. The starting point is a monument standing just in front of the centre of the French lines a few metres south of the Belgian border.



Orientation map of the initial deployment
Orientation map of the initial deployment

There are some excellent orientation maps around the monument which give good detail of the units involved along with their deployment and movements. The French side of the battlefield benefits from a signed walking tour which can be followed with the aid of a most helpful app. This gives information and maps in English as well as French.



Bois de la Laniere on the French right
Bois de la Laniere on the French right

One thing that struck us was the very limited visibility. Although there are no significant hills, the gently rolling terrain generally limits visibility to less than 200 yards. The main French infantry lines were on a slight reverse slope with the result that troops on the opposing sides would have been unlikely to see each other until within less than 100 yards of each other.


The Bois de Sars at the point where Lottum attacked
The Bois de Sars at the point where Lottum attacked

The woods which formed the flanks of the gap which the French defended are still there. The Bois de Sars to the west still has the same outline as it did back in 1709. It is hard to imagine just how the tens of thousands of allied troops managed to attack through them to emerge on the other side.



Information board on the site of the French redans
Information board on the site of the French redans

There are no traces of the French redans or entrenchments but their locations are reasonable well marked and by walking along their lines it is possible to get a sense of what it must have been like.



The allied forward battery circled in red
The allied forward battery circled in red

Many accounts of the battle say that Marlborough’s grand battery of 40 guns first fired into the Bois de Sars to support Lottum’s attack. Then they switched their fire to engage the French cavalry that could be seen on a slope behind the French foot, hidden by their reverse slope position. Although we tramped over all the possible locations for this battery there are no good fields of fire to substantiate this. The maps by the monument suggest another battery of 10 guns and 3 howitzers well forward of the allied centre and indicate that is was probably indirect fire from this battery which inflicted casualties on the French horse to the rear.


Memorial to the French senior officers killed in action
Memorial to the French senior officers killed in action

The small church in Malplaquet has a memorial to the French officers killed (Lieutenant Colonels and above).


Malplaquet church
Malplaquet church

The church was there in 1709 and although it has since been re-built it was done so in a way to closely resemble the original.



Blairon farm cicled in red viewed from the French centre
Blairon farm cicled in red viewed from the French centre

Blairon farm forward of the French lines forms an obstacle we had not appreciated. It is not so much the farm itself as the deep north-south running stream that runs through it. This, and the now much depleted Bois Thierry to the north, break up the allied line of advance. Once committed beyond this point it would have been pretty well impossible to move troops from the allied left (east) to the centre or visa versa.


Scattered around the battlefield are several monuments as can be seen in the following photos:



Monument to the Swiss regiments on both sides
Monument to the Swiss regiments on both sides


Monument to the British regiments that fought at Malplaquet
Monument to the British regiments that fought at Malplaquet

Plaque at the position of the French artillery which decimated the Dutch
Plaque at the position of the French artillery which decimated the Dutch


Monument to the French carabiniers who held the left flank
Monument to the French carabiniers who held the left flank


19th century mural on the side of a barn
19th century mural on the side of a barn









By smacdowall, Aug 28 2018 04:34PM

Having previously refought the battles of Blenheim, Ramilles and Oudenarde I am now turning my attention to the last and bloodiest of Marlborough’s great battles — Malplaquet (1709).


The Battle of Malplaquet
The Battle of Malplaquet

I have most of the troops I need but a few reinforcements are still required. First off the painting table if the French régiment de Champagne. This regiment of the vieux corps was fourth in seniority after Picardie, Piedmont and Navarre. It played a key role at Malplaquet, where it lost 50% casualties.


Earlier in the War of Spanish Succession the Champagne regiment was engaged on the Upper Rhine, taking part in the battles of Friedlingen (1702) and Blenheim (1704). It was transferred to Flanders after Oudenarde and therefore did not take part in that battle, nor Ramilles. This is why such a senior regiment has been left out of my wargames order of battle until now.



Drummers wore the King's livery
Drummers wore the King's livery

Like all the senior French line infantry regiments, the régiment de Champagne wore grey-white coats with cuffs of the same colour, brass buttons and yellow lace on their tricorns. Their waistcoats were red. The drummers wore the king’s livery of blue coats with red/white lace.



Two battalions of the regiment
Two battalions of the regiment

I have painted two battalions of 15mm Minifigs. The first battalion carries the colonel’s colour — the prestigious drapeau blanc (white cross on a white field). The second battalion has the drapeau d'ordonnance of a white cross on a green field.

The first battalion carries the drapeau blanc
The first battalion carries the drapeau blanc



The second battalion carries the drapeau d'ordonnance
The second battalion carries the drapeau d'ordonnance


The rear view
The rear view


The two battalions together
The two battalions together




By smacdowall, Mar 9 2018 06:53PM

For an upcoming refight of the Battle of Oudenarde I intend to field half of the 175 battalions and 320 squadrons in 15mm. Each battalion will be 3-4 bases with 4 foot miniatures per base. A squadron will be represented by single base of two mounted figures.

I have most of the French but need a few more to bring up the numbers. I decided to take this opportunity to paint up a few more foreign battalions to reinforce King Louis XIV's armies of the early 1700s.


Regiment Royal Italien
Regiment Royal Italien

First up is the Royal Italien. Brown coats had been relatively common in the French army of the 1600s but by 1708 they had been replaced by the more familiar white-grey. This regiment, recruited from Italy, kept their brown coats with red facings throughout the war or Spanish Succession. At Oudenarde they fought in the first line brigaded with 4 French battalions.


Regiment de la Marck
Regiment de la Marck

The German Regiment de la Marck is next. The Comte de la March (Graf von der Mark) commanded a French brigade at Oudenarde including two battalions of his regiment. Like all German regiments serving in the French army, de la Marck wore blue coats, most probably a relatively light shade. In their case with yellow cuffs.

Regiment Dorrington
Regiment Dorrington

Finally we have the Irish Regiment Dorrington. As far as I can tell, Regiment Dorrington did not fight at Oudenarde although some Irish did. I already had a brigade of 3 battalions of Irish and wanted to bring it up to 4 battalions. As Dorrington (later Roth) fought in many engagements of the war I decided to include them. All Irish regiments wore red coats. Dorrington had blue cuffs and waistcoats and their flag was a very English-looking St George's cross.


By smacdowall, Apr 22 2017 09:50PM

In June 1658 the last battle of the Franco-Spanish War, English Civil War and French Fronde rebellion was fought amongst the dunes near Dunkirk. This engagement captured my imagination and two years ago I started on a project to build the armies needed to re-fight it with 28mm miniatures representing the various forces involved.

On one side, under Marshal Turenne, were French Royalists aided by a sizeable English Commonwealth force, supported by the English fleet. On the other was the Spanish army of Flanders, British Royalists in exile and the Prince of Condé’s French frondeurs. As regular readers will know from my posts over the past couple of years, I concentrated on building up the French (for both sides), Spanish and British Royalists, leaving Gary Kitching’s excellent New Model Army figures to form the English Commonwealth contingent.


The historical battle came about when Don Juan of Austria (the Spanish governor general of Flanders) led 6000 foot and 8000 horse to relieve Turenne’s siege of Dunkirk. Rather than waiting for them, Turenne marched north through the dunes to attack with 12,000 foot, 7000 horse and 10 light guns. Caught by surprise the Spanish/British/French army deployed along a line of high dunes without time to bring any artillery into the line nor to recall half of their horse which were away foraging.


Despite the difficult of manoeuvring through the sandy dunes the Franco-English won the day. The English foot under Sir William Lockhart charged up a very steep dune to engage the Spanish and Anglo-Scottish-Irish Royalists frontally as some of the French horse managed to get around their right (seaward) flank by advancing along the beach. Supporting fire from the English ships helped.


The full table view with Franco-English on the right.
The full table view with Franco-English on the right.

Our game started well for the Franco-English.


On the meadows to the landward side, the French Royalist cavalry made short work of the first line of French rebel horse, seeing them off and then catching them in the rear as they fell back. One French rebel unit which had ridden through the ranks of its opponents decided to surrender and profess loyalty to the king rather than be surrounded and cut to pieces.



On the seaward side, the guns of the English fleet started to wear down the Spanish troops deployed to protect that flank as a large number of French horse advanced along the beach despite the umpire’s warning of the incoming tide.


A unit of Spanish mounted arquebusiers suffered so heavily from the naval guns that they had to withdraw to recover their order as if they stayed put they would risk suffering significant casualties.


Turenne held his French infantry centre back, engaging the Walloon, German and French foot in Spanish service with long range musketry, no doubt feeling confident that a victory on both wings was nearly in the bag. Indeed the Spanish players were overheard musing what we would do for the rest of the day as the battle seemed almost over.


Then it began to turn. On the meadows of the landward side, Turenne’s front line horse chased the enemy off the field and half of them decided to loot the Spanish camp rather than return to the action. This, along with the timely intervention of the Spanish lancers and cuirassiers of the guard stabilised that wing for a while.



In the centre the Duke of York’s Lifeguards charged and overran the French guns. They decided to keep going on to Dunkirk rather than turning back to continue to play a role in the battle.



On the seaward flank the incoming tide caused half of the French horse who had been working their way up the beach to turn back and head for solid ground. The others were driven in closer to a Spanish Tercio guarding the beach flank and took casualties from musketry while masking the supporting fire from the English fleet.



The first line of the English charged up the dune behind the cover of a forlorn hope. They did well but not well enough to take the position so they fell back. Then the second line charged, also meeting the English and Irish royalists as well as the Spanish.



They very nearly made it but an inconclusive result was not enough to break the Anglo-Spanish line.




Those of the French horse who had managed to make it around the seaward flank, attacked a Spanish Tercio from the front and rear. Unfortunately for them they were in a state of disorder, had taken significant casualties from musketry and the Spanish had a deep formation of pikemen who had a second rank able to turn around to protect their rear.



The cavalry attack made no headway against the Tercio. Then the Spanish mounted arquebusiers who had previously withdrawn to recover their order attacked them in turn, supported by a battalion of Scottish foot.


At this point, as the foot of the Spanish centre were slowly stepping back to avoid contact, we called an end to the game. The French had a significant advantage on the landward side, nothing significant had occurred in the centre and the English attack on the seaward side had been blunted.


The Spanish had fared better than they did in the historical battle but they did not win the day and most probably would have given up any further attempt to relieve Dunkirk without reinforcements.


Despite their numerical superiority and the lack of Spanish artillery, the Franco-English army had a very difficult task. Advancing over the dunes to attack an enemy on higher ground was never going to be easy. They almost made it but not quite. No doubt the scribes on both sides would be hastily recording victory although the result was actually a draw.


The battle was fought using Close Fire and European Order rules available as a free download from my website here.





















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