Legio Wargames

The Legio Blog

By smacdowall, Apr 17 2017 05:15PM

My troops are nearly assembled for the Battle of the Dunes which will be re-fought later this week. I have been too busy painting and doing other things to post many pics of the newly recruited units and will try to correct this now.


This is King’s Own English Regiment — the forerunners of the Grenadier Guards. Formed from Englishmen who had followed King Charles into exile and supplemented by English soldiers from the French army who answered the King’s call to join him in Flanders when France entered into an alliance with Cromwell.


There are a few fleeting references to King Charles II receiving a supply of white (or grey) cloth from his Spanish allies to clothe his men. I have assumed that this regiment has received some of these coats — the blue turn back cuffs being conjectural.


As the regiment was made up from a steady trickle of individuals who had been serving in several different French regiments I imagine that there would have been a variety of dress. Therefore not all of the men are wearing the Spanish-supplied coats. By the time of the restoration the regiment was probably in red. So I have added in a number of red coats along with the usual French browns and greys.


The miniatures are a mix of Dixon Grand Alliance, Northstar 1672, Front Rank Monmouth rebels and a few Perry English Civil War. The pikemen, ready to receive cavalry, are Dixon French which come with a variety of heads. One of them sports a classically influenced helmet which is said to have been

popular in some French units of the time.


The men are wearing variations of the long justacorps which was becoming fashionable but had not yet supplanted the shorter jacket of the English Civil War. My intent was to give the sense of a hastily raised regiment at a time of transition before uniforms became the norm.



Next up is another Spanish Tercio. I have chosen to give my Spanish a more archaic look than their French enemies and British allies as I will re-use them for earlier battles of the Franco-Spanish War and Thirty Years War. Some contemporary paintings indicate that the Spanish may have hung onto older clothing styles as the French took to new fashions. Musket rests seem to have more or less fallen out of use by the 1650s but as I had a number of good looking miniatures with them I decided to not worry about this.


My previous Spanish Tercios were painted in the same style using a similar mix of miniatures. This unit has been mostly recruited from Warlord Games (both plastics and metals) with one or two Redoubt and The Assault Group thrown in for variety.


I wanted to give the unit the look and feel of veterans. The heyday of the Spanish infantryman had probably passed but these men will have fought in many campaigns and have a reputation to live up to.



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