Legio Wargames

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By smacdowall, Aug 15 2018 10:54AM

I have long considered building an Ottoman army to provide a new and interesting opponent for my War of Spanish Succession Imperialists. I was, however, put off by the sheer numbers of troops I would have to raise and the fact that there are no opportunities for fielding a contingent two to serve as allies in any of my existing armies. Fortunately one of my friends decided to do it himself. Not only that he has the space and patience to raise an Ottoman army in 28mm scale.


Ottoman light cavalry
Ottoman light cavalry

I played the Ottoman right wing commander with an all-cavalry force of light Tartars, Bedouins and Akinci irregulars backed up by some heavy Sipahis. As a cavalryman at heart, these are exactly the type of troops I love to lead on the wargames table.


Süleyman the Magnificent
Süleyman the Magnificent

Our Sultan, the benevolent and magnificent Süleyman, arrayed his army with a powerful artillery force in the centre along with elite Janissaries behind mobile fortifications.


Jannisaries and artillery of the centre
Jannisaries and artillery of the centre

His plan was to wear down the Hungarian foot with superior firepower, while the cavalry wings drew off the enemy mounted knights and retainers.



Commander of the Hungarian right wing
Commander of the Hungarian right wing


Hungarian knights and retainers
Hungarian knights and retainers

The Hungarian knights were heavily armoured with many riding barded horses. In an even combat they would inevitably have the edge but we had many light cavalry who could wear them down.



My light cavalry overwhelm the enemy right
My light cavalry overwhelm the enemy right

Although I had initially planned to simply wear down the enemy cavalry on my flank, good shooting by my Tartar horse archers gave me the opportunity to close in and overwhelm the enemy light cavalry screen. I was then able to drive off the entire enemy left wing, forcing King Lajos to move his reserve knights to shore up his collapsing flank.


The Ottoman guns open fire
The Ottoman guns open fire

In the centre our guns opened fire at long range.


The enemy foot take casualties from artillery fire
The enemy foot take casualties from artillery fire

Although it took 3 turns for our heavy guns to re-load, by the time the enemy Landsknechts and Hungarian foot reached our lines they were already beginning to waver.



The cavalry engagement on our left
The cavalry engagement on our left

On our left a huge swirling cavalry battle developed which flowed back and forth with neither side gaining a significant advantage.



The Saphis rout
The Saphis rout

Meanwhile on our right, King Lajos’ reserve knights succeeded in routing my Saphis. Isolated and in danger of being surrounded by my hordes of light cavalry the Hungarian knights called off their pursuit and pulled back to re-form. This gave my Saphis the opportunity to rally.



The enemy foot crumble
The enemy foot crumble

When the Hungarian foot came into close combat with the Janissaries in the centre, they were so worn down by artillery and musket fire that their lines crumbled.


Victory was ours. We had destroyed the Hungarian left wing and centre. We had managed to hold their right wing and their reserves without having yet committed our own reserves.





By smacdowall, Aug 13 2018 11:33AM

It has almost been a year since I played the German commander in day one of an Operation Seelöwe game which I reported on here: The Battle of Folkestone July 1940. The end of this game saw the Germans establishing a salient around Hythe and Folkestone after suffering heavy casualties.



Folkestone in German hands
Folkestone in German hands

After a number of strategic moves conducted by email, we picked up the action a few days ago, moving the game on to day three. The situation at the end of day 2 looked pretty bleak for us Germans. The Royal Navy had made a mess of our attempts to reinforce and resupply by sea and despite the Luftwaffe’s best efforts to establish air superiority we did not have control of the skies. Low on ammunition and thin on the ground the temptation was to hold on to what we had and await reinforcements. The British, however, would be able to reinforce far more quickly than we could so I decided that my only option was to try to expand the salient and position my troops to eventually take Dover and its vital docks.


The German plan
The German plan

I knew I did not have the strength to take Dover so I gave orders for my best units to move east from Folkestone to cut the road and rail links into the town in the hope that I could isolate it. Having beaten off a counter attack on Hawkinge airfield and receiving intelligence that the enemy had ‘shot their bolt’ in that sector, I also decided to expand the salient to the north so as to be in a better position to protect that important airfield. I would leave just enough troops to hold the western edge of the salient, especially Lyminge airfield and the port of Hythe. I suspected we would have to face a British counter-attack and so I ordered my commanders to take up defensive positions as soon as they ran into any serious resistance.


The British plan
The British plan

The British did indeed counterattack and did so in more strength that I had feared. Our attempt to expand the salient turned into a defence of our vital points: the airfields of Hawkinge and Lyminge, and the ports of Hythe and Folkestone. We beat off an attack on Hawkinge with relative ease thanks to the quality of our troops aided by an effective Stuka bombing run.


The German defence of Hawkinge airfield
The German defence of Hawkinge airfield

In the west the British attacked both Lyminge airfield and the approach to Hythe in divisional strength. I judged that with three battalions in good defensive positions and a regiment of Fallschirmjäger in reserve I had just enough men to hold without diverting any troops from the east. It was touch and go. We managed to hang on by the skin of our teeth but it took all the remaining ammunition of our supporting artillery and our last remaining bombing runs to do it.


The Battle for Aldington
The Battle for Aldington

On the approach to Hythe the 2nd Battalion, 21st Infantry was reduced to only one platoon but they passed all morale tests and hung on in the village of Adlington while the Fallschirmjäger flanked the enemy that bypassed them. The RAF intervened but fortunately their air sorties were far less effective than ours. A few reinforcements arrived by sea at Hythe. This was just enough to ensure we could hold the western flank.


The British attack in the centre
The British attack in the centre

We had barely time to congratulate ourselves for the successful defence of Hawkinge airfield when the British launched a major attack from the north aiming for Folkestone town. We had very few troops in this sector, our artillery was low on ammunition and we had no air sorties left. Therefore we had to redirect troops from the east, including our only Panzer battalion to deal with this attack. The fighting was fierce and we inflicted heavy losses on the enemy but at a terrible cost including the complete destruction of our armoured reserve.



The Germans shift troops from the east to the centre
The Germans shift troops from the east to the centre


The massive British attack from Dover
The massive British attack from Dover

At this point the British launched an attack from Dover in overwhelming strength — both armour and infantry. Our eastern flank was only thinly held, we were out of artillery ammunition, had no tanks left and no more air support. It had been very hard fought and our heavily outnumbered troops had acquitted themselves incredibly well. With the enemy in a position to dominate Folkestone Docks there was no longer any hope of significant reinforcements and therefore Operation Seelöwe had failed.



The table overview
The table overview

Although we lost it was a great game and a very hard fought one. As in the previous game we used 6mm miniatures with Spearhead rules. The rules worked very well for an operational game of this magnitude. They were easy to pick up by novices with the aid of some judicious umpiring.





By smacdowall, Aug 7 2018 06:00PM

Painting has taken a bit of a back seat over the past few months as the warm sunny weather has been keeping me outside. For the first time in ages I have picked up my paint brushes with the intent of finishing off some Marlburian dismounted dragoons that have been sitting idly on my painting table for some months.


At the outset of the War of Spanish Succession dragoons were still primarily mounted infantry. Horses, often poor nags, were used for mobility but the men would dismount to fight. French dragoons continued to operate this way for most of the war, their great value being internal security, foraging, scouting and briefly holding strong points ahead or on the flanks of the main army. As the war progressed many Allied dragoons increasingly became second class cavalry — paid less and riding smaller, less well trained mounts than troopers of horse. By the end of the war dragoon regiments in some nations (Denmark for example) had been converted into proper regiments of horse. Britain went the other direction. Regiments of horse were re-designated as dragoons as a cost saving measure as dragoons were paid less than horse.


Austian dragoons in action against the French
Austian dragoons in action against the French

Although most Allied dragoon regiments operated as second rate cavalry in the major battles of the War of Spanish Succession, there were occasions in the early years when they dismounted. Dismounted Imperial dragoons at Friedlingen (1702) supported battalions of converged grenadiers to attack the French in the hills of the Black Forest. At Schellenberg (1703) the North British Dragoons (later the Scots Greys) dismounted to support an attack up the steep hillside. Some allied dragoons also dismounted at Blenheim (1704).


Dismounted French dragoons (red coats) supporting Swiss foot
Dismounted French dragoons (red coats) supporting Swiss foot

I have dismounted figures and horse-holders for all my French dragoon regiments and I thought it about time I did the same for some of my British and Imperialists. Finding suitable miniatures is a bit tricky as not many manufacturers make dismounted dragoon figures wearing tricorns suitable for the allied units I wished to represent. I eventually settled on Blue Moon Miniatures who have a set of tricorn-wearing dismounted dragoons in their Great Northern War range.


These new recruits to my army will probably be enough to provide the allied dismounted dragoons I may need for future engagements. The British can also serve as Dutch as Dutch dragoons all wore red coats. The blue and grey-coated Imperialists could also double as Prussians and other Germans.


Dismounted British Dragoons
Dismounted British Dragoons


Guidon of the North British Dragoons (Scots Greys)
Guidon of the North British Dragoons (Scots Greys)


Imperial Bayreuth (blue) and Swabian Hoenzollern (grey) Dragoons
Imperial Bayreuth (blue) and Swabian Hoenzollern (grey) Dragoons



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